Home 2018-05-30T10:34:58+00:00
2018-05-30T12:10:22+00:00

June 2018

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Today we begin a new arts writing series commissioned by The Ford Family Foundation’s Critics and Curators Program, with founding Editors Stephanie Snyder, John and Anne Hauberg Curator and Director, Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College; and Sue Taylor, Associate Dean, College of the Arts and Professor of Art History, Portland State University. The Foundation and its partners share a goal to strengthen the visual arts ecology in Oregon, and a key interest in increasing the volume of critical writing on art in our region. To that end, Stephanie Snyder brings a review by Portland writer Sam Hopple [...]

2018-05-30T12:05:19+00:00

Heather Watkins: Waiting Room at PDX CONTEMPORARY ART

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By Sam Hopple Originally published May 2018 In Waiting Room, Heather Watkins presents a series of thirty-two, hand-stitched embroideries that line the walls of PDX CONTEMPORARY ART. Winding in a rhythmic, even pace around the gallery, these compositions comprise a body of textile works on linen that Watkins has been creating in various waiting rooms since 2015. With this knowledge, the gallery itself begins to feel both intimate and a bit uneasy. Yet, while the familiarity of anxiety-ridden medical environments comes to the surface, Watkins’ embroideries are strangely soothing, poetically beautiful, and complex. They speak to how we experience the [...]

2018-05-30T09:17:18+00:00

“The Last Supper,” Oregon Art Beat

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Julie Green, Oregon 06 September 1996. 5 fried eggs (Sunnyside-up), hash browns, bacon strips (crisp), stack of pancakes with syrup, hot coffee, milk, and cold orange juice, 2002. Courtesy of the artist and Upfor Gallery. Oregon Art Beat. "The Last Supper." Oregon Art Beat. 28 March 2013. Oregon Public Broadcasting, March 2013. Courtesy of Oregon Art Beat, OPB. Artist Credit: Julie Green Exhibition: Oregon Art Beat

2018-05-30T10:12:55+00:00

Abstract Art as Political Art: Lynne Woods Turner by Sarah Sentilles

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Abstract Art as Political Art: Lynne Woods Turner by Sarah Sentilles Originally published August 2017 Lynne Woods Turner’s abstract paintings and drawings trouble certainty. Her art reminds you that what you think you see might not be all there is to see. It demands careful viewing: Look at a single Turner drawing and watch it shift before your eyes. To be in her studio is to be in the presence of a master, for whom decades of disciplined, daily practice have resulted in a deep engagement with material and form and mind-blowing mastery of craft. Yes, she draws perfect circles [...]

2018-05-30T10:21:26+00:00

Call and Response as Critical Chorus by Amy Bernstein

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Call and Response as Critical Chorus by Amy Bernstein Originally published by PORT September 09, 2009 In a world increasingly fixated upon the propulgation, proliferation, production, fetishizing, and pushing of objects and things that we somehow need, it is ironic that we question less and less the inherent significance of these particular objects as symbols. They literally fill up and inhabit the space of our lives in the most tangible way, reflecting status, wealth, and even personal ethical codes. Yet we look upon these objects less and less as societal talismans, intrinsically weighted and dripping in all of their reflective [...]

2018-05-30T09:37:33+00:00

“Northwest Matriarchs of Modernism: 12 Proto-feminists from Oregon and Washington”

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Allan, Lois, Matthew Kangas, and Terri M. Hopkins. Northwest Matriarchs of Modernism: 12 Proto-feminists from Oregon and Washington. Marylhurst, Oregon: The Art Gym at Marylhurst University, 2004. Courtesy of The Art Gym, Marylhurst University. Artist Credit: Kathleen Gemberling Adkison, Doris Chase, Sally Haley, Mary Henry, Maude Kerns, LaVerne Krause, Hilda Morris, Eunice Parsons, Viola Patterson, Ruth Penington, Amanda Snyder, Margaret Tomkins Exhibition: Northwest Matriarchs of Modernism : 12 Proto-feminists from Oregon and Washington (View PDF 1MB)

2018-05-30T11:09:02+00:00

Amy Yao • Ditch Projects (1)

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Amy Yao, September 7 - October 5, 2013. Installation view. Springfield, Oregon: Ditch Projects, 2013. Ditch Projects art space and Coast Time artist residency are pleased to present Amy Yao as the inaugrual recipient of the Art by Northwest Award (ANWA). This annual award, available only to artists from outside of Oregon, is designed to import work that will trigger creative discourse within Oregon. As the recipient of the ANWA, Amy Yao received a one-month residency at Coast Time in August 2013, a solo exhibition, Ditch Projects, Springfield in September 2013, as well as a generous stipend. For more information [...]

2018-05-30T11:09:56+00:00

Amy Yao • Ditch Projects (3)

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Amy Yao, September 7 - October 5, 2013. Installation view. Springfield, Oregon: Ditch Projects, 2013. Ditch Projects art space and Coast Time artist residency are pleased to present Amy Yao as the inaugrual recipient of the Art by Northwest Award (ANWA). This annual award, available only to artists from outside of Oregon, is designed to import work that will trigger creative discourse within Oregon. As the recipient of the ANWA, Amy Yaoreceived a one-month residency at Coast Time in August 2013, a solo exhibition, Ditch Projects, Springfield in September 2013, as well as a generous stipend. For more information on [...]

2018-05-30T11:10:39+00:00

Stephanie Snyder, Editors’ Statement

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Originally published April 2017 To write is to send thoughts and feelings into the world—seeds that take root and blossom into emotional sustenance. To write is to travel alongside streams of associations, coasting through time and space, folding time into memory, dreams, and reflections. To write critically is to push evaluation into position, to engage history and the knotty threads of disciplinarity and account for one’s ideas against an invisible congress of other critics. Every act of writing diagrams a set of critical and imaginative relations. Writing still matters, and artists are writing more than ever. That tells us something [...]